Standing up for young americans

Voting FAQs

When is the next election?
There are federal, state, and local elections nationwide on Tuesday, November 4th, 2014.
How will I find out where to vote on Election Day?

Polling places can change up until the last minute, so make sure to double-check your polling place online or by phone. Check with your local elections official (click here to find their contact information).

How do I know if I’m already registered?

You can check here — and if not, register now by clicking here.

What should I bring to my polling place?
Some states now require you to show a government issued identification to prove your identity before you can enter the voting booth. Follow this link (http://www.866ourvote.org/state) and select your state to find out if you need to bring some form of government issued identification with you to the polls.

Also, if you marked your “sample ballot” make sure to bring it with you! It will not only help you remember who and what you want to vote for, but it will save you a ton of time in the voting booth

What is a Voter ID?
Some states require you to bring a “voter ID” with you. Your “voter ID” card will come to you in the mail after you register to vote. In addition to your “voter ID”you will receive information telling you where your polling place is and what you need to bring with you on Election Day.

What if I never got my voter ID card in the mail or I lost it before the election?

This is nothing to worry about! Remember, not all states send out voter cards, so if you don’t receive something in the mail you can always call your state’s office and double check you are registered. Click here to find the contact info for your state’s Secretary of State office. Again, because this card includes your polling place address on it, make sure to double check your polling place the night before the election!

What time do polling sites open and close?

In all states, polling places generally open between 6 and 9 a.m., and they close between 6 and 9 p.m. But each state varies slightly in its polling hours so we definitely encourage you to check on your state’s Secretary of State website for this information.

Can I still vote if I’m in the armed forces or living abroad?

All eligible Americans have the right to vote, but the rules for people in the armed forces or abroad are different than people living in the United States. For information about voting abroad, contact the Federal Voting Assistance Program (http://www.fvap.gov or 800-438-VOTE). Also visit the

Overseas Vote Foundation for detailed information on registering and voting overseas.

If I want to vote in elections, when do I have to be registered?
I have a state-specific question about voter registration or elections in my state. How do I contact my Secretary of State’s contact information?

We’ll hook you up. What state will you be voting in this year?

I am not going to be in town for the elections. How do I sign up for an Absentee Ballot form?
  1. Easy! First, check to see if you are currently registered to vote at this site.
  2. If you are not registered to vote yet, use our tool to the right or go to http://www.ourtime.org/vote/ to register.
  3. Then, go to the Absentee Ballot request site and create a login for a Voter Account (or you can continue without one).Fill out all the appropriate information and click “continue”. The next page will ask you to create an account again or continue without an account, continue to the next page.
  4. Finally, download your form for print, sign it, and send it in to your Election Office address that is provided for you!
  5. That’s it!
Do I need to bring a government issued ID with me to vote?

Possibly. It depends on the state. Some states now require you to show a government issued identification to prove your identity before you can enter the voting booth. Follow this link (http://www.866ourvote.org/state) and select your state to find out if you need to bring some form of government issued identification with you to the polls.

Why do the dates of the primaries keep changing?

Traditionally Iowa holds the first caucus, which is then followed by the New Hampshire primary. Some have argued that this gives those two states an unfair advantage in determining which candidates will continue their campaign. Since there are few formal rules regarding the primaries, most of the dates are chosen out of tradition.

Click here for your state’s primary/caucus date.

What are the main political parties?

Constitution Party: www.constitutionparty.com
Democratic Party: www.democrats.org
Green Party: www.gp.org
Independent American Party: www.usiap.org
Libertarian Party: www.lp.org
Reform Party: www.reformparty.org
Republican Party (Grand Old Party): www.gop.com

Have a question? Email us or contact your secretary of state.

 

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